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castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.

The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.

During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.

During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.

EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 

On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.

EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.

One of the greatest movies of all time no question

(Source: david-own-world)

inheritedloss:

hey sooooo remember how the police in ferguson were going to start wearing body cameras

the police officers’ union is bringing out every last excuse to keep it from actually happening

actual quote from the article: “This gotcha discipline that we have with the dash board cameras is what we’d be afraid of,” Roorda said.

"gotcha discipline"

basically “any tangible way of holding us accountable for abusing our power is what we’d be afraid of”

"Gotcha discipline"

As in… getting disciplined because you were caught doing a bad

theterriblecanyonsofstatic asked:

saw your post about al capone being human garbage. I agree. However i love mafia and crime syndicate type history. i do not approve of anything that they did. I just think it was an interesting part of history. Am i a piece of garbage?

willin-and-illin:

realsubtle:

Not in the slightest. It’s good to be interested in this stuff. It doesn’t mean that you are supporting the atrocities committed or the institution of organized crime. In fact, more people should think like you do on this matter. People learning more about this stuff means dragging these evil organizations from the darkness where they thrive into the light where they can be publicly scrutinized in all their aspects. And if you pursue their trail deeply enough, you eventually arrive at the beating, corrupted heart of capitalism itself. Who was it, I think it was Smedley Butler or somebody who talking about capitalism being a gangster ideology, and the more you uncover the history of capitalism and the criminal underground the more you realize that’s true, both in direct parallels between crime bosses and powerful capitalists, and in terms of direct collaboration between the military/police/intelligence apparatuses of the capitalist world and sympathetic criminal syndicates. Think of some of the CIA’s activities, not the fodder of conspiracy theories but the documented reality of their actions. A keystone of their strategy to eradicate communists was to support local enemies and thereby fight them by proxy. This extended to strategies like supporting the Kuomintang remnants who ended up in the Southeast Asian ‘Golden Triangle’ and became, at that time, the world’s most successful poppy-producing, heroin-peddling gangsters. With full knowledge of heroin’s dangers and a stated policy of fighting drug addiction at home, the United States covertly supported this entire operation as a means of giving the reactionary nationalist forces a quixotic hope for retaking China from its revolutionary communist government.

If you stay interested in and learning about this stuff, you’ll find so many interesting stories like that to utterly discredit all the heroic myths of American capitalism and its supposed superiority to all other systems. You’ll find out about the origins of crack, all the coke dealers our local and federal governments gave a pass to or actively worked with. You’ll find out all the local crime syndicates the United States would rather support than support communists, socialists, or economic nationalists. You’ll find out how the United States did almost the exact same thing as they did with the Kuomintang in Southeast Asia, this time in Afghanistan with imported Arab fighters and local warlords during the US-Soviet proxy war (except much worse).

So, why be ashamed of your interest in this stuff. It’s horrible, but horrible things are fascinating to us for a reason, because they often have lessons to teach us. Therefore, my advice to you is to keep feeling fascination, and pursue it as far as you can.

spoiler alert for origins of crack: it’s reagan

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